Building and Scaling Great Teams w/ Vishal Sunak

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

One of the biggest frustrations at a high growth software company can be the speed at which you’re releasing features and functionality. You’re a high growth software company, so why does it seem like you’re moving so slow in this area?

And how do you bring your teams together to meet product launch deadlines?


On this episode of Application Modernization, we sit down with Vishal Sunak. Vishal is the Co-Founder and CEO of LinkSquares, the first AI-powered end-to-end contract life cycle management platform.

We talked all about:

  • How to build great teams that release new features at a rapid pace
  • Why you must align teams to focus on the "right" new features
  • How to save costs by scaling infrastructure with AWS and serverless
  • Why it’s important to always plan one quarter ahead
  • His approach to hiring and building a high performing leadership team

Want to hear more stories from high growth software companies? Subscribe to Application Modernization on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or check out our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for Application Modernization in your favorite podcast player.

You are listening to applicationmodernization, a show that spotlights the forward thinking, leaders of HighGros software companies from scaling applications and accelerating time tomarket, to avoiding expensive license and costs. we discuss how you caninnovate with new technology and forward thinking processes and savesome cash in the process. Let's get into it. Welcome to application modernizationtoday, we're talking about building and scaling great teams with Vachel SonicCo of link squares, a contract management solution that elevates legalteams to write better contracts and analyze existing contracts in one easyto use platform for Char and his CO founder Chris comes founded, linksquares in two thousand and fifteen and have since grown the company to ahundred plus employees and hundreds of happy customers during this growth forChal's focus on building great teams has helped him to keep the companyaligned on a road map that has prioritize feedback from customers andteam members, and it's these great teams and leaders that have helped linksquares, move incredibly fast in this episode will hear how link squares,builds, teams and processes that release new features at a rapid pace.Aligns teams to focus on the right new features and scales infrastructure withaws and Servilus to save costs. Here we go with our guest vecha sonic. He vecha.I love your founding story. You and Chris Built your VP in two thousand andfifteen. Tell me how you approach that and you know a bit of what were youthinking at the time yeah. We were two guys with an idea, and I hypothesisthat I don't think companies know what's inside their executed contractsand I hadn't been working at a tech company and went through an acquisitionprocess. Bigger company came in and bought US and asked US lots ofquestions, and so we couldn't answer what we agreed to in customeragreements, and I looked out in the market and I said to myself: Wellthere's lots of tools in like contract management generally, but it didn'tseem like there was a focus on Mike docens. You already executed versusdocuments that you're trying to sign like pre. Second Chilano when wethought about you, know the very earliest of days really aroundvalidation validation that we as entrepreneurs have found a problem.That is worth solving and I think that was a really important part of thejourney. Although slow and painful very long kind of twelve months of talkingto essentially the buyer of our product today and formalizing and synthesizingkind of what their needs are, what do they buy? What tools do they have? Howdo they think about it? What are their pain, points and kind of going fromthere yeah? I remember back in two thousand and sixteen you had a littledemo day, thinking Atlanta and you spoke about some of the cold email thatyou were using to try, and you know just start speaking to some of yourcustomers. You can understand their...

...needs. Can you share a little bit moreabout you know that approach and what you learn yeah, so in squares as aproduct selling, to primarily general councils and back then in two thousandand fifteen two thousand and sixteen I knew exactly zero and I said to myself:Well, if I know zero general councils- and it's not like, I could potentiallylike go to an event, but it's kind of creepy to let's just like start talkingto people about startups. What's the easiest way to get in front of thisbuyer at Valida, what we're doing- and so I had worked at a bunch of companieswhere, like outbound was, was a very valuable tactical strategy, and so westarted cold emailing general counsels, Hey I'm misha! You never heard about methe S of his company. I think you have this problem around, not knowing what'sinside your contracts like. Will you give me twenty minutes and it works? Imean I remember the first kind of big send. We did maybe two hundred contactswe had like fifteen hand raises, and some amazing, like Unicorn companies,just reply and they're. Like hey sure, we can talk, and I remember tellingChris how you know how naive we were. I was like we made it bro. We did it, but long attorney, you know even fromthen until now, but yeah it's just kind of like being unafraid about saying toyourself. I need to validate and I'm not a lawyer, I'm not a general council.I can't validate it because of my own knowledge right, so ere's, a reallyimportant distinction of like how are you validating problem, how youvalidating a solution right and the easiest for us was just turn the meterto. I don't care and break the handle and just start emailing anyone andeveryone we could find. That's that's one way to get that insight. So whenyou're getting this insight and you're learning about your customers and yourbuilding out your first sort of version of the product and then you know, thenyou bring on a couple of customers and have to sort of innovate and scale thatplatform t to meet. You know the new demand talk us through. You know howyou went from to Juana on to five customers to the twenty to thirty, a D,and what were some of the considerations that you needed to thinkabout on that to Jenny Yeah. So our analyzed product was the first productthat we built, and we have two products now. Two different use cases, butthinking about essentially a very super charged repository meant that initiallyvalidating that we could build a cloud base repositor where documents could bestored and then from there continuing to show people some of the reportingand the searching and the types of insights they get gather which,ultimately, through enough conversations and the and the earlybelievers, had some real pain like they had one had a security breach and theyhave to go through all their contracts and figure out what they agreed to.This customer, in particular, had worked with like the world's largestbrands, like that was their whole thing, like building communities and along thejourney. What we begin to realize was...

...people liked the ability to like taketheir contracts and like search them, especially scamps, and be able to dolike word. Searching but the real path to an amazing experience was some sortof automated way for the Assistant to tell them what they've agreed towithout having to read it without having to manually, search it andthat's kind of the validation of like an a I journey and applied a use caseright being able to have algorithms, read a contract and actually extractand create meda data. Essentially, the same would be like an algorithm inputsfields into salesforce com. On behalf of the sales or a based on a voiceconversation they had right. It was kind of the same thinking of like Huh.This could be something that could be immensely valuable like if you had ahundred pieces of data, what you agreed in a contract, you didn't have to readit and it was super fast and really accurate. Definitely something thereright. So, as you were your scaling, your team you're, bringing on newcustomers. You know we spoke earlier, but we fore going live here. You knowyou've got your ten teams now working concurrently, you know, and it'sgrowing rapidly what a some some tactics and strategies that that you'reusing to sort of build those teams and ensure everyone's working togethertowards the end outcome. Yeah I mean first of all, it's alignment on theRoad Map and alignment on the Rod. Mat means inputs from everyone in thecompany and our customer base right. So what is sales hearing in the marketevery day right and if you're thinking about your sales team correctly, theyare not only the closers of new business revenue and potentially upsells and renewals, depending on how you set it out, they're, also gettingreal time market feedback about how our positioning of our product is in amarket and with a bar, so not to say we over fit in any direction, but it's areally valuable insight right. If you talk to fifty general councilsyesterday and our product was a great fit for fifty of them, and you knowthat, like okay yeah, we have the course set of things, but then, as soonas you start to hear like. Oh, I wish the problem did this and it doesn't dothis or your competitor? Does that and I really see value in that and then youtake those inputs? You obviously listen to customers and how do you quote a go?Listen to customers. Well, they come in through like support tickets or Bristhat the success team has, or we have a customer advisory panel. We get themtogether. We show them kind of new things, and new areas were going totake the products and and new features that we think could add value and alsobecause I'm in a competitive market like we're opportunities where what Ithink about it is like customers have a pre existing bias that they need thisfeature and because this feature may have been available for the last tenyears or fifteen years and to what extent should we contest that and whatextent should we reinvent that or to what extent should we recreate it basedon their input right, I mean ultimately,...

...the five most kind of dangerous wordsin our company. Are It would be cool if blank, and it would be cool, doesn't,should never should never come to come to light ever in decision making right,and so you got a line on the road map, and I think one thing that's reallyimportant is you got a line on dates and it's the hardest thing to do? It'slike asking the question of like how the universe got formed like it's. Thehardest thing to do in this game is to say this thing will ship in April thisthing you ship in June seventeenth this thing will ship in August, twenty flike just trying to own the dates, even though things happen, priorities getshifted, stuff comes up even technically. The design process, likethings that we're doing that are you know, truly novel. Truly new canincrease just timeand and horizons. I mean that's like a big priority.Something we've been working on is just you. Can we get things done in quartersas promised you know? What's next is? Can we get things done in months aspromised and a lot of it comes down to then after that building on time?Building for high quality and then the whole process around launches yeah, Isay in the company that the actual building of the Sophar code- that'sgoing to get merged into the master branch, is probably ten percent of theoverall exercise to build something meaningfully and new right and sowhat's left in the ninety percent. Is Training in the sales team training,the success team, updating your pricing and packaging up dating your website.Updating your Zen desk knowledge base. Creating videos walk through guides,training, the teams on how to demo it and then also how do we position thecompany? Maybe it's such a significant feature like the day we built thesecond product, now we're sweter products, and then there's there's adifferent change, ship, positioning and branding, and so there's a lot thatgoes into the road map and very little of it, even though it can be verydifficult, it has to do with the software. That's fascinating! You know.One thing: I've ever really seen in the last six twelve months is new featuresthat you're rolling out you've got the email integration or to renew dashboardsmart values. How do you move so fast and what advice do you have for otherleaders at high growth companies that are just they're moving too slow, thenthey're getting now frustrated by you know the speed at which they'rereleasing features and functionality yeah. We think about a quarter ahead atany moment in time, so the work that we're actively building in Q to wasgroomed decided on designed user stories created so that on the firstApril the build of those stuff can begin right, and I say this now is thecompany is approaching like a hundred people right and we're definitelyafforded different luxuries than when we were twenty people and we alwaysdream about the day. We were a hundred people and we could do this sort ofstuff, but you know to the ascent that...

...it's possible. It's like you, have tothink one quarter ahead and you can't start the design work on the first ofApril. If you expect to have it shipped again back to what I was saying by thefifteenth of May, because you are you access to take over and build the mockups and you got to get validation, you got to write the user stories and youbasically have to have all the work on deck wore to go one quarter in advanceand think about yourself going ahead right and also it means saying no, Imean saying no, no matter what and owning the road map and creating a culture inside the organization that,even though we're a hundred people, we just can't do everything all the timeconstantly. Just because one constituent in the company be itsuccess, be its sales even be a customers can govern things that canhappen kind of asychis ly, like everything has to follow likeperiodicity for us right. It's like, we think about things, a quarter inadvance. We designed them to be built the next quarter. Then we build them.There then we're thinking about the next quarter and that's cool like I'm,not thinking seventeen quarters at head, like in two thousand and twenty four.We will two thousand and twenty seven. We will launch the feature if they tryto think about it. One quarter ahead. If you're really good at it, you canstart thinking two quarters ahead. Right, I think saying no is, is a veryinteresting sort of topic to maybe dig a bit deeper on you know often timesyou know in some organizations it's the loudest leader, you know has to say,and you know often times you know, people may get a bit distracted in theway that they, you know, go about their road map. What do you look? For I meanyou were data guy like how do you sort of try and make those decisions aroundyou Rodman? One of the best things that I do is hire a bunch of experts andtell them what is important to me and get and try it as hard as I can to getout of the way and trust them to make the right decisions and coach them andcheer lead them when they can't make a decision or it's too hard of a decisionor it's something. That requires a little bit of risk that I'm happy toassume that risk, but for the most part, letting people who actively groom whatwe should build and internal to the company and the product managementorganization, letting them advocate for what theybelieve is important in per product or per part of the universe that theycover and try to let everyone, you know at least build the most important thingthat they believe, because if you're doing this whole thing right, theproduct managers are essentially the microphone. That's picking up all thedifferent voices and constituents and opinions and then crossing that withwhat we can build and what resources are available, and so I think, we'redoing doing a great job there continuing to think about what is thenext most important thing or what are things that can enable new businesssales or enable retention conversations or enable up selling ultimatelyefeatures that don't do one of those...

...three things other than likeinfrastructure, work and re factoring, because stuff is broken. It really. Welends everything with like. Why do we build this? Well, we build it for thenew business team because of these deals that didn't work out. They saidit was missing this. So hypothetically. If we had this, then the next fiftydeals that come up that require x feature. We can maybe turn a no into ayes right, and so every feature is really lends with. Can I help newbusiness? Can It help with retention? That's just like overall customerhappiness to whether they're an ever neal conversation or not, and can itdrive meaningful kind of recurring revenue through expansion right, and sowe lends every decision like that like. Why? Why? Why do we build this like?Why is it an urgent need right and you speak of building and relying on yourteams and hiring for people that can make those decisions? You know I lookat your growth and you hide your co in two thousand and seventeen, your aheadof sales in two thousand and eighteen in head of marketing in two thousandand nineteen, can you share your approach to hiring and building out aleadership team yeah? So, as CEO, I have a really simple philosophy: I'mone person, I'm only good at so many things, there's only so much time inevery day. So when I think about a leadership team, I think about anexpert in every role in the company who works for me and if you're doing itright, you hire a bunch of experts and because they are experts, they areeasily enabled to hire people who want to be just like them, like. I think every engineer on ourengineering team basically wants to be ARICA. My to right once the knowledgethat Eric has wants. The ability to build things like Eric does want theability to make technical decisions like he does right, and so I think it'sa massively powerful recruiting tactic and strategy. It's that, if you have agreat leader there and a great expert, they will naturally magnetize the besttalent to them, and that definitely is true in likesales teams and in my sales team and my success teams right. The people that Ihave running the department is really a reflection on me: N, the Cel, and so wefound that to be really the most powerful magnetizing power ofrecruiting is why don't you come join us on the sales team. You'll haveamazing sales directors who could easily be VP s sales at any techcompany in this area or anywhere else. You have an awesome. Cro who's beenaround the block. WHO's helped scale this stuff, who has made an amazingcareer for himself, and if you hang around with all these great experts,well, you know who do you think the next expert is, and it's so funny, mycro posted on linked in, and he said I don't hire account executives. I makefuture Cros. I think I saw that he has...

...some really nice interest in out thereor posts on linked in and it looks like it works in terms of recruiting. Iactually a lot of engagement on this post yeah. No, it's been working sowell, and building network building community, especially we live in anawesome me, goes to so much like Atlanta right in the Boston area. Hereit's just ripe with amazing talent that have been spent a couple yearselsewhere at other great tech companies, weren't some great stuff kind oflooking for a change looking for their next step, but yeah I mean, if youthink about that, then every engineer were building cos there we're not we'renot building just single threaded individual contributors and that's kindof like the bigger thinking that can help magnetize talent right right. Sospeaking of the engineering and building this platform, what alwaysfascinates me is, you know I believe, you're using aws cloud and that'shelping you scale your infrastructure to meet the needs of your customerslike what are some of the sort of challenges along the way from aplatform perspective that you've sort of run into that. You know, as youscale, from what one customer to five to ten to fifty to a hundred. Is thereanything that you know it keeps coming up that you need to consider yeah? Wedefinitely need to consider like multiple simultaneous actions beingperformed in parallel right and pieces of code pieces of infrastructure like,for example, bulk up loads right. The analyzed product takes all yourexisting documents and we loaded into our amazing repository and read thedocuments with ai so like if we had ten customers or we do like one bulk upload a week right or you know, adding customers there after you know nowwe're adding you know fifty customers in a period or a hundred customers in aperiod or two under customers in a period we have a lot more people tryingto do the uploading right and so things slow, downall right things take longerthan expected. Things may even break right, and so it's like they're, ifyou're doing the whole scaling your Sass Company. Will you already know thethings that are resource, intensive processing, intensive right? And sothen that leads you down and it should lead you down different innovated patslike there's a big component of our ai pipe line that curves and having a aservirla pipeline and serios processing is both very cost effective. You knowversus having servers that are just on twenty four seven trying to keep upwith the load. You know you do things servers, you can sleep and turn on andsleep and turn on, and you can say cost because they're not running, and sosome of the challenges that you face, like as a company grows in scales likeyou, also need to grow and scale kind of the innovation and the thinkingaround when a hundred of these occurred in parallel when a thousand of theseare current per when a million of these occur in parallel, are we prepared tohandle that and we also have the...

...philosophy? That's like you know it'slike future visha problems like you future. Michelle has a lot of problemsthat the past Ofishal, you know is created for him and that's okay tooright, there's certain bets you can make you can solve it all to a hundredpercent accuracy. You probably don't have the time right, but to the extentwhere you can start thinking about like will this thing hold up yea. Will thisthing hold up when we have fifty customers right, I mean a great example:Is Ourai processing pipeline, like we've processed, like I don't know, ahundred million pieces of data now and it's a process in generally, a hundredhundred million of anything means you got to have probably thought about thatwhen you built it the first time, right to the extent that you can, you know,do that right, it's easy to say it's really hard to do, especially if you'reexploring like we weren't a big server list shop and so again, if you hire abunch of experts that are like yeah, I understand it. We can. We can do this,I I understand it and then it enables your future to be better but there'splenty of, like you know, future vishes problems to yeah so with say cloud technologies andhow you see sort of cloud moving in the next it of two three four five years.You know what do you? What do you see customers needing to consider youmentioned Servilus? I think you know a lot of customers are still trying toget there. Is there anything else that you know is something that's really topof mine for you, yeah top of mind, for me is always kind of the same thingslike try to make the software as usable as possible and as easy to use aspossible. Like can single buttons take care of massive actions. The otherthing is really around the intersection between like machine and human, whichis like a really interesting thing, and as companies are trying to eitherforcibly or build companies that have a I components like what is theintersection between what a human did? What a machine did? Do you understandwhat the machine did? It's the machine made a recommendation or an inferenceor an extraction or generally a piece of data like to what extent do youunderstand the decision, the machine made? Do you understand how you couldoverride that decision and make help it assist in the next decision that it'sgoing to make for you, and so those concepts are really kind of likefascinating right? You know we're living in a world where decisions canbe made by a machine, it's possible. To what extent do you want that machine tomake that decision and o what extent do you need to validate that the machinemade the right decision and like how do you do that in like a Ui right right?You know, I always joke that, like millions and millions of dollars andyears and years of our lives building this Atechnic, that to read a contractessentially bubbles down into a thirty thirty pixel that shows an icon that wehave high confidence like that's it...

...like, whatever else does matter likeI've found the effective date in the contract I extracted it. I put the datethere and I put a little icon and that's it like you know: How do yousynthesize this massive mathematical processing and this huge giganticreading of words and sentences and probabilities of math, but ultimatelypeople can't understand that stuff right I mean people can't understandthat, but they understand that an icon is green. That means, as I confidenceyeah yeah your spot on, I hit that intersection. Yeah between you know,what's the robot going to do what's the human going to do if something willuncover in the next a few years and will become clearer. So switching gearsare a little bit and you know moving back to building teams and scalingthese teams. How do you sort of see, link squares growing in the next sortof one to three years and how important is other teams to that growthy yeah, Ithink triple the size of the technology organization triple the size of theSale Sen, and if you, if you have big goals right to triple organizationalsizes, then the hardest part is keeping people aligned, keeping peopleand sink aligning on the Road Map. Thinking and working ahead beingprepared having a very good launch process right, and so, if you're asoftware company, then the software is a thing that people buy. So thesoftware doesn't work or you're building the wrong things. Then you'regoing to slow down your revenue organization just trying to get peopleto buy it, and then your success organization get people to use it andmake them happy right. And so it's the same game that it was three years ago.It's the same game that it is now it just becomes harder, because one daywe'll have twenty five teams building and parallel with five people on eachteam- and you know the good thing is: is that, like you know we're not thefirst company that ever think this way right, there's so many great articlespublished and kind of common knowledge that we all share like how does Hobspot do it and and they obviously focus on smaller teams with like a pan and ain a front end designer and back in engineer and a front of anengineer and a Kwa resource and like you, go and bigger by actually goingmuch smaller right, and I think the key that to doing a lot of work in aquarter or in a period or a spring is to actually think about doing things inmuch smaller units and that's hard to do. You obviously need a lot of peopleand it's hard to keep them insane, but that's the best way to do it right.That's the best way to do is, I think, much smaller teams, smaller teams thatcan own something and be it takes one sprint or two sprints or three sprintsor whatever. The answer is that's the way you do it right and and adding andramping things slowly right. I don't have to triple the size of myengineering team this month, but as you...

...kind of begin to learn like okay, whenwe had three teams building and parallel life was like this and thennow we have ten teams. Building in parallel life is different, so we'velearnt more about how to go from three to ten, and so I'm more confident inthe journey of going like ten to twenty teams, then then, maybe even goingthree to ten. That was like really hard right, and so the systems and processesare on communication. cadences meetings, grooming right, a lot of it comes downto like fault: Let's follow a process right, let's follow a process but stillable to react right as quick as we can. That's really interesting. So whatadvice do you have for other high growth software leaders when it comesto you know, building out these teams that do you have any resources bookslike where should they go to try and seek some of this additional advice?Yeah, there's there's a number of a kind of great kind of like avenues thatfolks kin is, for. I end up spending a lot of my time like reading mediaarticles and there's a number of great ones around, like potii sharing abouttheir development approach in the smaller teams and- and even I think,it's well categories documented like hub spot right, even though, likethere's lots of resources, I really like businesses, software and I've,like kind of passively attended some of the some of the conferences in yearspast and just like hearing from great software builders C to chief productofficers talking about their journeys, I think saster does a great job to alot of the content is geared towards like fund raising and sales. But sasterhas all these amazing online events this year and returning in personSeptember really around like how did you do it? What were the things thatyou were thinking about? Where did things break right and also we seek outa lot of like peer mentors? A lot of peer mentors have helped us. You knowwe keep in an infinite amount of space in our brains and our time for you know,mentorship and be that in, like my c to is in like a vd engineering C to for EM.So he can ask more tactical questions about like what do you do forrecruiting and how do you think about talent? How do you think about talentvalue which I think about building in the bill process in like if you'regoing to be a long term, leader and you're, going to ride a company for tenyears from nothing to IPO and beyond that? It's in your best interest tocontinue to learn how others who are further down the path have done itright, and some of it can't be translated, because every business isdifferent. But there are some really good nuggets out there right andthere's some really. I mean it's never been the better time to just be able tolearn and be and be I kind of unafraid of cold emailing, a great leader inyour town. In De, like I'm, a huge fan and- and I love kind of the journey ofthe company and I'd love to just like ask you some questions about how youdid it right and those are the people...

...who get ahead right, we're gettinginputs from everyone right, everyone, people that we have in the team, newopinions and the diversity that we built inside the company coming frombig companies. Small companies publicly traded companies venture back companies,private equity on companies like how does it work like take all those inputstry to try to do the best of greed that works for you right, but constant,continuous learning, we're never done. We can always be better right. Couldn'tagree more last question for you of a shall. Where do you see yourself andlinked squares in five years time? What what's the vision? And you know? Whatare you excited about? Yeah, I'm I'm most excited about taking thisdepartment inside of a company in the legal department, elevating theirstatus and getting them out of a lot of thework that has dragged them down historically in the last ten years andthe some of the stories we hear about people with like juris doctor, it'shaving to like get files that are signed, rename them to a nomenclature,put them in a folder open up a spread sheet, collect a hundred pieces of datamanually, and I kind of like in it to like. You, have a heart surgeon, who'snow, responsibilities to also clean all the instruments. And you will you knowyou re not a lot of time to be a hard surgeon and be the best of what you do,because you're bobbed down with kind of the administrative work that can takeup sixty seventy percent of your week right and I think, even though themission will never be done. Like you know, five years from now, people uselink squares across the organization and all different things right and andthey're, using the platform to help make their lives better and moreinsightful and collaborate and speed, and that's really the dream. What wehave like your sales team uses our presigned CT to draft order, forms andmake DAS, and your legal team can work with your sales team directly insidesales for use, and they can. The legal team can work where they want. Theywant to work in the web application they want to work in Microsoft wordthey went to war work in O, true and sixty five, you know and then and thenthinking even extending right, extending the offering of a sweet rightof products, like you know getting into things like R, FPS and management ofour PS, because that's a big process and getting deeper with like procuringteams and like how do you buy vendor agreements and by contracts and vendorsand by different things? And you know what can we do to elevate the statusright? The most concerning thing I read is like you know: Gardner says thisyear: Legal teams inside companies, their budgets are going to stay thesame or be as to reduce. So what does that mean? They have yet to prove thevalue to the CEO and the CF, and maybe the board of just what they can do ifthey just had better tools like their peers. Do Right and that's the thingthat wakes me up every day gets me out of bed fired up about it. Yeah, Hey,look that I love that vision. It's been so fun to watch your journey since yourtwo thousand and fifteen. I can only...

...sort of imagine how much value you'recreating for these legal teams and really to propelling them to have amaybe a bigger seed at the table and create even more value for their ownorganizations for Charlet's, been a pleasure having you are now podcasttoday. How can our guests and our listeners find you and follow? Youonline sure check out the company and Lin Scorca connect with me on linked inlove to meet and chat about technology and and building great companies, andthank you or us for having me to pleasure great to create to connectalrighty thanks for so application. Modernization is sponsoredby Red Hat the world's leading provider of enterprise, open source solutions,including high performing Linux cloud container and coup Brunetti'stechnologies. Thanks for listening to application,modernization, a podcast for high growth software companies, don't forgetto subscribe to the show on your favorite podcast player. So you nevermiss an episode and if you use apple podcast, do us a favor and leave aquick rating by tapping the stars join us on the next episode to learn moreabout modernizing your infrastructure and applications for growth until nexttime. I.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (13)